Even in 2016, "Mad Men"-like ideas of masculinity still persist, and that's not a good thing.

While we've certainly come a long way, the ideas of how boys and men should act are still all around us (thanks for nothing, toxic masculinity). There's still the expectation that men should be silent, stoic, aggressive — you know, the ancient sexist proverb, "boys will be boys."

Beyond just attitudes, gender norms dictate that from a young age, boys should be athletic, playing with GI Joe's, Hot Wheels, and whatever else the (male) kids are up to these days (forgive me, I am #old).

But Kirsten McGoey, an educator and photographer at Trinity Design, is flipping the script on gender norms in a way that's rarely seen. Her latest photo series, #ABoyCanToo, features boys between the ages of four and 16 doing what makes them feel happy.

And sometimes, that involves ribbons, tap dancing, and dresses.

McGoey, who is a mother of three boys, said her middle child inspired her to create the series.

photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design

"I have this little son who is, what you’d call a 'pink boy,'" she told Revelist. "He loves to dance and sing and act, and he never thinks about gender ever."

"We just let him be his amazing self."

"It just doesn’t occur to [my son] that any choice that he makes is illogical. He wants to do it, therefore it is OK."

photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design

McGoey didn't just want to do the project — she said she needed to.

photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design

"If I was doing a project that was fashion-oriented, it’s not part of my truth," she said. "It’s not part of why I was put on this Earth."

The result is heartwarming beyond words.

photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design
photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design
photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design
photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design
photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design
photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design
photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design
photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design

Although she's certainly holding a mirror up to the culture of toxic masculinity, McGoey says she doesn't call herself an activist.

photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design

"I don’t look at myself as an activist," she said. "I look at myself as a progressive person, a progressive parent who feels very, very, strongly that my little son taught me a way of looking at the world that I would have never expected."

photo: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Design

Cover image: Kirsten McGoey/Trinity Designs