Emma Jane Woodhams is a fitness influencer and reality star. Woodhams recently shared a photo of herself wearing a waist trainer. The blogger boasted the waist trainer as a healthy alternative to Brazilian butt lift surgery. However, she did so while referencing a recent news story about Leah Cambridge, a 29-year-old mother who died while receiving the operation. Many felt that the blogger was exploiting the tragic death of a young woman to sell waist trainers. 

Emma Jane Woodhams, a fitness blogger and reality star on "Love Island," is under fire for how she chose to promote a waist trainer.

Woodhams regularly posts images of herself wearing a waist trainer on her Instagram account. 

"I’m on the final hooks of my @maskateertm waist trainer ???????? You ladies know I’m all about loving your body and working with what you have rather than changing it completely to unrealistic shapes! This is such a rewarding and effective way to bring your waist in and give yourself an hour glass figure under your clothes without surgery," Woodhams wrote in a caption earlier this year. 

The mother says she began wearing the waist trainer to bring her stomach muscles back together after being diagnosed with diastasis recti following the birth of her son. 

However, in a recent post, Woodhams used the tragic death of 29-year-old Leah Cambridge to promote the product. Cambridge died on the operating table while receiving a legal Brazilian butt lift operation. 

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So today I read an article that these Brazilian bum lift surgeries everyone’s been getting are actually really dangerous and are fatal for every 1 in 3000 procedures ! I have said it before and I’ll say it again ladies get yourself a @maskateertm waist trainer, squat till you drop and work with what ya mumma gave you⏳ embrace your natural shape. It’s safe, it’s easy and it gives you beautiful results that just enhance your natural shape under your clothes or more permanently over time, without taking such risks. After reading the comments on this I am in shock ! I have no where on this post mentioned one individual that people have referred to. I read an article yesterday as it’s in the news a lot at the moment about how one in every 3000 bum jobs goes extremely wrong (there are many cases not just the one) and so have brought to light an alternative to feeling the need to have a surgery so dangerous and drastic. All women and girls see on Instagram (myself included) are these perfect huge bums with tiny little waists and big boobs, which anyone can understand is why we are all in pursuit of that ‘goals’ body. This is a way of achieving a more natural goal without feeling you have to go under the knife or take enormous risks, I have always promoted working with what you have and loving to learn your own body. I do not feel that this post in anyway disrespects a single person or their family (I didn’t even write it with a specific case in mind) If I can help women by sharing something that helps me to feel more confident without extreme measures then I do not see any harm in sharing it. Side point - I have posted about these procedures being dangerous many times before making the same points I have above, highlighting these products (the posts are still up) I never came under fire because people did not automatically associate it to one specific case and so saw it as a wider point. This procedure hasn’t just become dangerous, it’s always been dangerous something I have preached many times before now. However, I apologise for both how this has been perceived by some and any offence that it has caused as a result of that - I honestly meant no harm or disrespect.

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"So today I read an article that these Brazilian bum lift surgeries everyone’s been getting are actually really dangerous and are fatal for every 1 in 3000 procedures ! I have said it before and I’ll say it again ladies get yourself a @maskateertm waist trainer, squat till you drop and work with what ya mumma gave you⏳ embrace your natural shape," Woodhams wrote in the caption. 

Yes, it's pretty ironic she is telling women to "embrace their natural shape" by modifying it. 

One person commented, "The fact your using Leah’s story to promote and get commissions on your waist trainer is absolutely appalling. Ever thought for a moment maybe some of Leah’s friends and family members follow you to see this is another blow to add to grief."

"This is absolutely disgusting! She should be ashamed of her self! Like these things are safe trying to make money off a poor girl losing her life is just sick in the head!! Anyone else find this post unbelievably insensitive?" another person wrote.

After Woodhams noticed the backlash, she disabled comments and updated the caption.

"After reading the comments on this I am in shock!... All women and girls see on Instagram (myself included) are these perfect huge bums with tiny little waists and big boobs, which anyone can understand is why we are all in pursuit of that ‘goals’ body. This is a way of achieving a more natural goal without feeling you have to go under the knife or take enormous risks, I have always promoted working with what you have and loving to learn your own body. I do not feel that this post in anyway disrespects a single person or their family," Woodhams said. 

Woodhams isn't the first person to promote waist trainers on social media. A couple of years ago, the Kardashians popularized the product. 

Much like how corsets deformed the bodies of Victorian era women, waist trainers do the same to modern women. This process is known as "tightlacing." 

corset waist trainers crush organs
photo: Creative Commons / Wikimedia Commons

"Women wore corsets to shape their bodies away from nature and toward a more 'civilized' ideal form," anthropologist Rebecca Gibson told Forbes. "A woman would wear her corset for almost her entire life." 

According to the Royal College of Surgeons, "Compressing the abdominal organs could cause poor digestion and over time the back muscles could atrophy. In fact, long term tight lacing led to the rib cage becoming deformed."

Regardless of how you feel about waist trainers, using a mother's death to sell them is not a good look?