US Navy

US Navy

photo: Instagram/usnavy

After a massive scandal, the Navy and Marine Corps are taking steps to protect female soldiers from revenge porn. 

The Navy updated their official regulations on April 19, according to Military.com

It is now a punishable criminal offense to electronically share intimate photos without prior consent. The guidelines also state that it's illegal to distribute photos for personal gain or to humiliate, harm, harass, threaten, or coerce anyone.

Marines who participate in electronic revenge porn may be prosecuted for violating an official order, according to Military.com.

"The recent message from the secretary of the Navy applies to all Marines," Marine Corps spokeswoman Ryan Alvis told Military.com. "This means that the wrongful distribution or broadcasting of an intimate image by members of the Marine Corps may be punishable as a violation of a lawful general order."

The updated guidelines is the latest response to the Marines United Facebook scandal. In March, Reveal reported that the US Department of Defense had begun investigating hundreds of Marines in connection to a secret Facebook page where naked photographs of female service members and veterans were solicited and circulated.

At least 24 women's full identities, rankings, and military stations were shared on the Facebook page, according to Reveal.

Marines United had roughly 30,000 members, but only two Marines have faced consequences thus far.

In April, two enlisted Marines were assigned to 45 days of military restriction, 45 days of additional duties, and a pay grade demotion, according to Military.com. Fifteen active duty service members and 12 civilians may also face consequences, according to Stars and Stripes.

In addition to revenge porn guidelines, the Marines also updated its social media policy to clarify that cyberbullying violates military orders as well. 

All of these policies aim to make the military more equitable for women.

"The addition of Article 1168 'Nonconsensual distribution or broadcasting of an image' to Navy Regulations serves to underscore leadership's commitment to eliminating degrading behaviors that erode trust and weaken the Navy and Marine Corps Team," rear admiral Dawn Cutler said in a statement. "It provides commanders another tool to maintain good order and discipline by holding sailors and Marines accountable for inappropriate conduct in the nonconsensual sharing of intimate imagery."