whitney way thore
photo: Instagram/whitneywaythore

"My Big Fat Fabulous Life" star Whitney Way Thore lives her life unapologetically, both on TV and IRL. The 33-year-old has been sharing her emotional and physical journey with viewers since the show's inception in 2015, and has become a source of inspiration and encouragement for many.

Thore is always ready to destroy stigmas the plus-size community faces (just consider how she normalized bikini photos on her Tinder profile), but this time around she's tackling the issue of people who shame the plus-size fitness community.

Thore revealed she'd been getting a lot of "accusatory" messages about her weight, her body, and her fitness routine.

Recently I’ve gotten a lot of comments and DMs with an...accusatory nature, asking me questions like, “If you work out so much, why don’t you lose weight? What are you eating?” and things like...”If you’re going to post workouts and not meals, that isn’t fair; we’re not getting the full picture.” ???? . You will never have a “full picture” of me, even from television. Do you know we shoot about 1,000 hours of footage a season that gets whittled down to fewer than 20 hours? The majority of instances anyone is shown eating are social situation or meals had while out dining. You also never see me shower, or go to the drugstore, or brush my teeth, or feed my cats, or read a book (or WRITE a book, for that matter), or sleep—are you to believe I don’t do those things, either, just because you didn’t see them? . For those of you who speculate about my eating habits, I’ll give you this: •I used to struggle with disordered eating, both purging (but not traditional “bingeing.” I used to purge regular meals), as well as restricting (eating as little as a few hundred calories a day for months at a time). The last time I engaged in either of these behaviors was in 2011 when I lost 100 pounds and —ironically— everyone thought I was so healthy. •I typically eat once or twice a day (but I’m working on eating more regularly. It’s a huge challenge for me). •Sometimes I eat past the point of fullness. •Sometimes I don’t eat enough to satisfy hunger. •I’ve been insulin resistant for 14 years due to PCOS, and that has an effect on weight gain and weight loss—no matter what weight you are. •PCOS in and of itself did not make me this fat, but it did cause me to gain a significant amount of weight over several months when I was 18. •Insulin-resistant PCOS coupled with shame, depression, disordered eating, alcohol, and lots of weight losses and weight gains have led me to where I am today. Some of this was a choice; some of it was not. . Where I am today is a woman who, just like you, is trying to be balanced, who is trying to be healthy (also mentally and emotionally), and who is just...doing her best. That’s it. •••photo by @@marie_killen//HMU by @shinypretties

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"Recently I’ve gotten a lot of comments and DMs with an...accusatory nature, asking me questions like, 'If you work out so much, why don’t you lose weight? What are you eating?' and things like...'If you’re going to post workouts and not meals, that isn’t fair; we’re not getting the full picture,'" she wrote. The star then explained no one can ever get the full picture just off social media.

Thore also opened up about her past struggles with an eating disorder and PCOS, plus some other food-related issues she has that many would be surprised to learn.

"I used to struggle with disordered eating, both purging (but not traditional 'bingeing.' I used to purge regular meals), as well as restricting (eating as little as a few hundred calories a day for months at a time). The last time I engaged in either of these behaviors was in 2011 when I lost 100 pounds and —ironically— everyone thought I was so healthy," she wrote. She explained she sometimes eats too much or sometimes eats too little, and struggles to find balance due to her PCOS diagnosis. "I’ve been insulin resistant for 14 years due to PCOS, and that has an effect on weight gain and weight loss—no matter what weight you are. PCOS in and of itself did not make me this fat, but it did cause me to gain a significant amount of weight over several months when I was 18."

Thore's words are crucial, as people need to understand that working out isn't always about losing weight.

But even if that is why someone's working out, that's fine, too. It's still OK for a body-positive person to be hitting the gym. After all, it's up to each person to decide what makes them happiest with their bodies.

WATCH: Women talk about being body shamed – Subscribe for more!

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